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6 Things to Know When Starting Therapy

Updated: Mar 20

Therapists have read the books, done the work and have the experience, but they haven't been on your journey, or know your experience; and this is where the two can come together.




Considering starting therapy, but not sure where, when or how to start? Therapy can feel daunting because it can feel like going into an unknown space, filled with uncertainty and intimidation. Therapists have read the books, done the work and have the experience, but they haven't been on your journey, or know your experience; and this is where the two can come together.


Here are 6 things to know when starting therapy that hopefully helps you feel a sense of comfort and certainty before entering the process.


1. It's okay to feel nervous.

Starting therapy can be nerve-wracking, like going on a blind date with your emotions. But remember, it's totally okay to feel nervous. Your therapist is there to help you feel comfortable and supported.

2. You might cry, you might not (and that's okay).


Therapy can bring up all sorts of emotions, from sadness to anger. Don't be surprised if you find yourself tearing up during a session. It's a sign you are tapping into some deep stuff, and it isn't always going to feel comfortable, but this isn't uncommon; and sometimes, things get worse before they get better. Often, people may expect to cry too, and it doesn't always happen. Be prepared to dive into your history, this is often where the challenges we face in present day have come from. Trust the process and you will arrive in a much clearer space.

3. Therapy isn't a quick fix; and every session isn't ground-breaking.


Therapy is more like a slow-cooked stew than a microwave meal. It takes time to see results, so be patient with yourself and the process. Rome wasn't built in a day; and neither is personal growth.

4. You don't have to have all the answers straight away; and neither does your therapist.


You don't need to have everything figured out before you start therapy. In fact, not knowing what's going on is often why people seek therapy in the first place. Your therapist has been on many journey's, but never on your journey. Your therapist is there to help you untangle the mess and find some clarity.


5. Having a pre-therapy list and post-therapy journal can be helpful.


Sometimes, having a list of things to take to therapy can be helpful. This could be reoccurring thoughts or situations. You might not cover all of it, or any of it depending how your session flows; but having a structure can help ease pre-therapy nerves. Similarly, post-therapy journaling can help reflect on what came up for you, what was discussed, or what you'd like to continue exploring. A lot of work happens outside of the therapy room, too, so it may be helpful in-between sessions.

6. It's not just for "big" problems.


Therapy isn't just for people with "big" problems like anxiety disorders or depression. It's for anyone who wants to improve their mental health and wellbeing, whether you are struggling with a specific problem or just need someone to talk to. There's no problem to small for therapy.



Want to find out more? Contact me with any questions you have, and I'll be sure to answer them.





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